Helsinki

SASHAPASHA: Fragile Narratives

SASHAPASHA: Fragile Narratives

Apr

29

Fri

12:00 – 17:00

8–11°C

broken clouds

The tragic war in Ukraine triggered by the Russian invasion will dramatically change our attitude towards memories. The principles by which we have dealt with the traumatic memories of the past will never be restored. All museum exhibitions related to previous wars must be rebuilt from a new perspective, with memories of World War II more linked to the present than to the past. SASHAPASHA’s Fragile Narratives exhibition deals with memories on different levels. Sasha’s objects and embroidery are related to her own memories, while Pavel’s work is based on the memories of her grandparents, but both have childhood memories in common.

Sasha’s mother has preserved Sasha’s childhood drawings. Most of them Sasha has done in kindergarten. Sasha’s name is written on the back of the teacher’s handwriting, followed by a period after the first letter of the last name.

At what point do adults lose their ability to create in the same way as children? Without fear of making mistakes, circled edges, changing proportions, or enlivening objects. The sun is smiling. Why don’t adults want to draw a smiling sun? As a child, learning things requires multiple repetitions. The notebooks are full of intricacies, numbers, letters and drawings. In her work, Sasha is in love with routines – the ritual of repeating, performing the same simple action until a complete end is achieved. He folds the postcards one after the other to make a curtain. Opening the veil gives access to his childhood world, where he is an artist and demiurge.

Pavel’s work on display jumps over one generation and builds a bridge between his own childhood and the childhood memories of his grandparents, the children of war. Objects are above all a metaphor. A wooden pen case that belonged to my grandfather, who traveled to Finland from Russia during the war. A wicker basket made by his grandfather during World War II on the White Sea Canal. Soviet-era lollipop molds used by her grandmother’s Ingrian family to survive over the winter while in an evacuation in Sverdlovsk.

The Fragile Narratives exhibition aims to build a bridge based on the concept of memories as a continuous stream. The ongoing war has shown that history is not a progression from wars and conflicts to humanity and peace. History is a loop of traumatic memories, and the fragile narratives of our own microhistories are our only refuge.

Fri 29 Apr 2022 – 22 May 2022 12:00 – 17:00

8–11°C

broken clouds

Address:
Eerikinkatu 36 / Kalevankatu 43,
Helsinki